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2006.08.16

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» ECM consolidation is helping no one from Open Sources
John Newton is back from vacation, and is back on his blog. Thank goodness. It's good to see a considered perspective on the various ECM mergers from the man who created the industry in the first place (when he co-founded... [Read More]

» ECM consolidation is helping no one from Open Sources
John Newton is back from vacation, and is back on his blog. Thank goodness. It's good to see a considered perspective on the various ECM mergers from the man who created the industry in the first place (when he co-founded... [Read More]

» IBM / FileNet Update from Architect Partners LLC
John Newton has some insight into the consolidation within the content management sector. A bit of wild speculation by Seth Gotlieb, a content managment consultant and another take on the deal and the sector by IT Analysis. [Read More]

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Search for in all major search engines simultaneously on the site http://www.iknowall.com.
Simultaneous search on Google, Yahoo and MSN Live Search.

Try http://www.iknowall.com

Search for in all major search engines simultaneously on the site http://www.iknowall.com.
Simultaneous search on Google, Yahoo and MSN Live Search.

Try http://www.iknowall.com

Could you in a future blog entry comment on JSR-283 and what you believe is missing from it in terms of functionality that should be addressed in future standards?

> Any predictions about long term how JSR-170/283 and iECM will stack up relative to each other?

I need to do a blog entry on these. Ironically, the amount of work each of them requires takes away from the blog.

JSR-283 is going faster than iECM since it is incremental. Both are affecting each other though, with common participation from IBM, EMC and Alfresco. I have contributed security and versioning proposals to both. FileNet is participating in both with two different members. FileNet is working on a multi-linking proposal in 283 and the query model in iECM.

I would hope that both will have something out by the end of the year.

Not that I evaluated this at all but I did get a smile when I noticed it was in progress:

JCR accessibility from PERL


http://search.cpan.org/~hanenkamp/Java-JCR-0.07/lib/Java/JCR.pm

Only a week earlier I had mentioned to Seth Gottlieb of Optaros that it was a shame that technologies tend to grow in complexity and support for functionality only to be abandoned when some new technology comes a long. Each revolution more ground must be covered (not always but more often then one would like.) I was glad to see a project that leveraged existing code.

John,

These are good comments on the direction of the ECM industry and the major players in it.
You mention both JSR-283 and iECM, and I know that you and David Caruana are very active in both of these standards.
Both Alfresco's support and quality of implementation of JSR-170 is great.

But JSR-170 has the obvious shortcoming of being Java-centric.
And from what I've seen, iECM also seems to be more vendor-friendly in enabling existing repositories.
Any predictions about long term how JSR-170/283 and iECM will stack up relative to each other?

Dick Weisinger
http://www.formtek.com/blog/

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